Joint outcomes

 

A new approach to joint health

Bleeding into the joints (haemarthrosis) and subsequent joint damage (arthropathy) are the most common complications seen in haemophilia1,2. By adulthood, 24% of all people with severe haemophilia will have developed one or more ‘target joints’ that carry an increased risk of recurrent bleeds and are functionally impaired3.

The knees, elbows and ankles account for 80% of joint bleeds4. Despite advances in treatment and care, joint bleeding and arthropathy remain among the most common complications of haemophilia and are major concerns of both healthcare professionals and people with haemophilia2.

We work on raising awareness of the impact haemophilia has on joint function. We want to empower patients and healthcare professionals to detect damage to joints early through our TalkingJoints® educational tools. These joint function programmes aim to improve the quality of life for people living with haemophilia and are part of our commitment to change haemophilia.

 

Find out more:

 

A new approach to joint health

Bleeding into the joints (haemarthrosis) and subsequent joint damage (arthropathy) are the most common complications seen in haemophilia1,2. By adulthood, 23.5% of all people with severe haemophilia will have developed one or more ‘target joints’ that carry an increased risk of recurrent bleeds and are functionally impaired3. 

The knees, elbows and ankles account for 80% of joint bleeds4. Despite advances in treatment and care, joint bleeding and arthropathy remain among the most common complications of haemophilia and are major concerns of both healthcare professionals and people with haemophilia2.

We work on raising awareness of the impact haemophilia has on joint function. We want to empower patients and healthcare professionals to detect damage to joints early. Our joint function programmes aim to improve the quality of life for people living with haemophilia and are part of our commitment to change haemophilia.

A new approach to joint health

Bleeding into the joints (haemarthrosis) and subsequent joint damage (arthropathy) are the most common complications seen in haemophilia1,2. By adulthood, 23.5% of all people with severe haemophilia will have developed one or more ‘target joints’ that carry an increased risk of recurrent bleeds and are functionally impaired3. 

The knees, elbows and ankles account for 80% of joint bleeds4. Despite advances in treatment and care, joint bleeding and arthropathy remain among the most common complications of haemophilia and are major concerns of both healthcare professionals and people with haemophilia2.

We work on raising awareness of the impact haemophilia has on joint function. We want to empower patients and healthcare professionals to detect damage to joints early. Our joint function programmes aim to improve the quality of life for people living with haemophilia and are part of our commitment to change haemophilia.

A new approach to joint health

Bleeding into the joints (haemarthrosis) and subsequent joint damage (arthropathy) are the most common complications seen in haemophilia1,2. By adulthood, 23.5% of all people with severe haemophilia will have developed one or more ‘target joints’ that carry an increased risk of recurrent bleeds and are functionally impaired3. 

The knees, elbows and ankles account for 80% of joint bleeds4. Despite advances in treatment and care, joint bleeding and arthropathy remain among the most common complications of haemophilia and are major concerns of both healthcare professionals and people with haemophilia2.

We work on raising awareness of the impact haemophilia has on joint function. We want to empower patients and healthcare professionals to detect damage to joints early. Our joint function programmes aim to improve the quality of life for people living with haemophilia and are part of our commitment to change haemophilia.

A new approach to joint health

Bleeding into the joints (haemarthrosis) and subsequent joint damage (arthropathy) are the most common complications seen in haemophilia1,2. By adulthood, 23.5% of all people with severe haemophilia will have developed one or more ‘target joints’ that carry an increased risk of recurrent bleeds and are functionally impaired3. 

The knees, elbows and ankles account for 80% of joint bleeds4. Despite advances in treatment and care, joint bleeding and arthropathy remain among the most common complications of haemophilia and are major concerns of both healthcare professionals and people with haemophilia2.

We work on raising awareness of the impact haemophilia has on joint function. We want to empower patients and healthcare professionals to detect damage to joints early. Our joint function programmes aim to improve the quality of life for people living with haemophilia and are part of our commitment to change haemophilia.

 

 

1. Mulder K and Llinas A. The Target Joint. Haemophilia 2004; 10(4):152-6.

2. Valentino LA. Blood-induced joint disease: the pathophysiology of hemophilic arthropathy. J Thromb Heamost 2010; 8(9):1895-902.

3. Summary Report of UDC Activity National. Treatment Clinical Characteristics (Hemophilia), accessed 30 March 2015: https://www2a.cdc.gov/ncbddd/htcweb/UDC_Report/UDC_Report.asp

4. Rodriguez-Merchan EC. Aspects of current management: orthopaedic surgery in haemophilia. Haemophilia 2012; 18(1): 8–16.


1. Mulder K and Llinas A. The Target Joint. Haemophilia 2004; 10(4):152-6.
2. Valentino LA. Blood-induced joint disease: the pathophysiology of hemophilic arthropathy. J Thromb Heamost 2010; 8(9):1895-902.
3. Summary Report of UDC Activity National. Treatment Clinical Characteristics (Hemophilia), accessed 30 March 2015: https://www2a.cdc.gov/ncbddd/htcweb/UDC_Report/UDC_Report.asp
4. Rodriguez-Merchan EC. Aspects of current management: orthopaedic surgery in haemophilia. Haemophilia 2012; 18(1): 8–16.


Joint function: Knee bleed


The knee joint function and the impact of a joint bleed

Watch on our video site


Joint function: Ankle bleed


The ankle joint function and the impact of a joint bleed

Watch on our video site


Elective Orthopaedic surgery


Elective Orthopaedic surgery in haemophilia patients

Watch on our video site